ANNUAL REPORT 2020-2021

The Committee has pleasure in presenting its Annual Report for the past year November 2020 to October 2021.

At the the start of this report year we continued with our monthly meetings on Zoom with the excellent programme of speakers organised by our speaker committee.  Many thanks to Ruth Archer, Elisabeth Burke, Helen Bellias and Anne Yeates. Meetings were still two hours, and incorporated a wealth of member contributions, from photos, stories, and reminiscences, to the sharing of expertise during our very own gardeners’ question time in March.

We also continued with our monthly online book club, thanks to Britt Tiller, and our newly formed film discussion group, initially managed by Tina Bissix and now by Daphne Jeffs. 

We are very grateful to Gill Harris who kept our ‘little grey cells’ active with challenging weekly quizzes which left us much wiser. Several of us also enjoyed the monthly Zoom ‘tea and chat’ sessions. 

The committee were able to keep in touch, by phone, with those of us not engaging in virtual meetings. 

As the warmer months embraced us the garden get togethers also returned, with either a morning coffee or afternoon tea kindly hosted by one of our ladies.

Marie Louise Oldrey, due to lockdown, held her annual plant sale in April from her home, and raised a very impressive £258 for our WI funds.

Glenys Pashley once again printed our annual Programmes and as it wasn’t possible to give them to you in the hall, they were delivered by hand or posted to you by members of our committee.

Tina Bissix produced lovely greetings cards out of recycled ones donated by members, with the proceeds of the sales given to Cedar Club funds.

Many thanks to all of them.

I give below our average attendance from November 2020 to October 2021 and details of some of our speakers:

During the year we held 9 zoom meetings with an average attendance of 27, since we returned to the hall in September we have held 2 meetings with an average attendance of 38. 

Ladies who joined us at our December meeting wore Christmassy hats, jumpers and sparkly jewellery, which added a very festive touch to the occasion. Chef, Alex Mackay, demonstrated some tasty recipes on what to do with our turkey leftovers. This was followed by a Christmas themed quiz. We also viewed photographs of Christmas crafts made by some of our talented members.

In January we heard about Maria Theresa of Austria who, in a man’s world, brought her country back from the brink of bankruptcy. She had 16 children, and her youngest child, Marie Antoinette famously became Queen of France.

 Our April meeting had a family history theme. We heard from several of our members, Denise, Fay, Karen, Helen and Glenys, about their own family history and how the internet has helped to research information and connect them with lost relatives.  This was followed by our speaker, Patricia Mitchinson, one of the creators of the BBC programme, who gave us a talk entitled ‘Who do you think you are?’ We heard how the series got off the ground and details about the celebrities reactions, including Danny Dyer who, to his great surprise,  discovered he was descended from Edward III.

May brought a talk all about the traditions of Morris dancing from Steven Archer, Ruth’s husband who has been a Morris dancer for 50 years. Later in the year Steven continued his talk on how the dance, through face painting and colourful costumes, is uniquely interpreted in different parts of the country. 

In June we were treated to two speakers, Dr Geoffrey Mead on how we fell in love with the seaside and how the resorts we know today developed, followed by Jo Mabbutt on the splendour of Henry VIII’s Field of the Cloth of Gold.

Ladies who joined us for our July Zoom meeting were asked to have ready to hand a fan, a cup, saucer and spoon and a book for deportment. David Allen, our speaker, then transported us back to a young ladies’ finishing school when he played the character Mr Hugo Bottomley-Smyth.  We were then given a very entertaining crash course in how we should have behaved when attending social events of the time. These essentials were necessary and would have prepared the young Victorian lady for her main purpose in life, to find and secure a suitable husband!

In July the Government announced that Covid restrictions would be lifted, and after positive responses from our members, we decided to go ahead with resuming meetings in the hall from September. Members were also keen to meet up in August so a Summer Lunch was planned. A delicious cold buffet was served by the committee. Thirty eight ladies attended and it was lovely to see everyone enjoying the lunch and chatting together in person after such a long time. 

In September we welcomed everyone back to our first monthly meeting in Churchgate House since March 2020.

At the end of September Gill organised our first WI trip out since lockdown.  We visited the state apartments in Kensington Palace, Princess Diana’s wedding dress on display in the Queen Anne’s Orangery and the Sunken Garden dedicated to Princess Diana, commemorated with her new statue. 

Our final outing of the WI year was a coach trip to the Kew Musical Museum where we were taken on a guided tour of the collection followed by lunch and afterwards a demonstration of their fully restored Wurlitzer theatre organ. A great day out thoroughly enjoyed by everyone who went. Many thanks to Karen for organising our visit. 

In January we voted on five NFWI Resolutions. Ratified in May and by far the most popular, was the winning resolution ‘A call to increase the awareness of the subtle signs of ovarian cancer’. 

Due to the disruption caused by the pandemic, NFWI extended the membership year by 3 months from January until April 2021.

CCCWI has been resilient and again adapted well to the challenges we have faced this year and we look forward to a more open and less restricted 2022. 




Zoom Meetings speaker Reports 2021

January 2021

Our talk this month was by Regine Neuhauser, who joined us from Vienna. Regine has long been fascinated by Maria Theresa of Austria, and with good reason. In a talk packed with information, she revealed Maria Theresa to be an extraordinary woman who, in the face of hostility from other states and no money in the coffers, preserved a huge empire and was a significant reformer, all while giving birth to 16 children, including Marie Antoinette.

If anyone would like to learn more, Regine has published a book which is available on Kindle: https://www.amazon.de/Maria-Theresa-Austria-Mother-All-ebook/dp/B079VH2DZ7


February 2021

Our Speaker, leading astronomer Dr Francisco Diego, held us spellbound with a masterful explanation of how the universe was formed in a way we could understand, and all in about 45 minutes. Entitled ‘Science and the Accidental Story of Humanity in Paradise’, Dr Diego’s talk revealed how our earthly paradise came about after hundreds of millions of years of cosmic and chemical reaction, and complete accidents. Whatever the process, the result is that man shares 98% of his DNA with a chimpanzee and 50% of it with a banana. We are inextricably part of the tree of life and must protect it.


 While this is very much an evolutionary rather than Creationist view, Dr Diego nevertheless referenced the way in which almost every culture and religion has a version of how the universe began, and sometimes of how man is seen to be thrown out of paradise. The photographs he showed of how man is instead destroying that paradise from within shattered any complacency we may have felt, contrasting as they did with the beauty and marvel of nature that came before. Only when humanity and the natural environment stop being slaves to the economy and the posLog Outition is reversed, says Dr Diego, can things improve, but time is perilously short.

One way to do this is through education, and Dr Diego’s most recent project is Think Universe! which brings this message to schools and organisations such as ours.


March 2021

Tim Albert spoke of his recollections of two Greyhound Bus tours he took 50 years apart, in 1969 and 2019. Needless to say, they were two very different experiences, and in his talk Tim compared the ‘then and now’ of the USA, of the impact of being 72 rather than 22, and of bus travel itself. His book on the subject is available for £10, tim@timalbert.co.uk.


April 2021


May 2021

Despite the gloomy weather we were able to celebrate a May tradition with a very cheerful talk from Steven Archer on Morris dancing. Steven has been a Morris dancer for 50 years, and any live demonstration he was unable to deliver on Zoom was more than compensated for by the wealth of videos, photographs and personal reminiscences.

Steven also delved into the long history of the Morris, a tradition that has been passed down through many generations from many sources. Over centuries it has fallen in and out of favour with society in general, and the church in particular, and has undergone several revivals, most significantly through the work of Cecil Sharp. At Christmas 1899 the pianist was visiting friends when local Morrismen called. Enthralled by their performance he embarked upon a written history and recorded the dances on paper for the first time. His handbook is still the bible for the Morris.

Disrupted in turn by the Industrial Revolution and two world wars, the Morris has 10,000 dancers in the UK today in 700 troupes or ‘sides’, although the traditional Cotswold style with which we are all familiar is diminishing.

Steven’s wry humour, together with the colourful history of the Morris, made for a very enjoyable morning.


June 2021

First, Dr Geoffrey Mead’s entertaining Resorting to the Coast covered the development of the seaside as a holiday destination – featuring places familiar to many of us - and then Jo Mabbutt talked about The Field of the Cloth of Gold, a spectacular meeting between Henry VIII and Francis I of France in 1520.

Geoffrey explained how, in the 18th century, the wealthy gradually began to take holidays on the coast rather than their accustomed spas, particularly around London, not least because their tradesmen were visiting the same places, and ‘dens of iniquity’ were springing up in places such as Tunbridge Wells.

He categorised the main reasons for going to the coast broadly as: 18th century, taking the waters and dipping in the sea; 19th century, taking the sea air; 20th century, getting a tan; and so far in the 21st century, access to fresh seafood.

Along the way racecourses, piers, motor racing circuits, holiday camps, bandstands, pavilions, aquariums, and much more developed as ways of keeping the wealthy amused, in town, and spending their money. A trend for purpose-built cottages gave way in the early 1900s to hotels, a new-fangled idea from France, while the advent of the railway made the coast accessible to the masses and for daytrips.

This fascinating glimpse of social history, in which we saw how so much we take for granted developed for particular reasons, was followed by history of a very different kind – the story of The Field of the Cloth of Gold. A magnificent temporary town the size of Norwich, it was built 501 years ago to bring about a peace treaty between two young, ambitious kings on a field outside Calais.

The keynote was equality, with the site being levelled so that neither side would be higher than the other. Nevertheless, in just three months, both strove to make their camp the most splendid, each spending the equivalent of £50 million today. Jo’s impressive research featured many statistics relating to such as quantities of food and drink, numbers of horses transported, and the scale of Henry’s brick and timber palace, which far outshone Francis’ fabric pavilion.

A talented decorative artist herself, Jo was most engaging about the richness of the decorative techniques such as embroidery, applique and stencilling used to exemplify the power and glory of Henry’s court, a real treat for our needlewomen. An exhibition on The Field of the Cloth of Gold is at Hampton Court Palace until September 5.

Zoom Meetings Speaker Reports 2020


ZOOM MEETING SPEAKER REPORTS

 June 2020

At our first ever Zoom meeting in June we heard a very entertaining talk by Paul Read, entitled ‘Reach for the Stars’.

Paul described his 25 years as a theatre dresser which, it turns out, involves a great deal more than just having costumes ready. The techniques involved in a quick change were astonishing, but more unexpectedly, we learnt that a dresser frequently becomes a performer’s confidant and right-hand man for the several months of a show’s run. Paul did an excellent job on what was also his first Zoom talk.

July 2020

In July we heard Monica Weller describe her remarkable investigation into the death of Dr Helen Davidson. Beginning from nothing, and encountering destroyed evidence, apparent police incompetence and a dark secret, Monica identified who she believed to be killer. Unfortunately she didn’t tell us who it was! However, if you are interested in her methods and would like to know the perpetrator, you may enjoy Motnica’s book Injured Parties – Solving the Murder of Dr Helen Davidson.

August

In August at our Pearl Anniversary celebration we were entertained by Kim and Clive Bennett, the Pearly King and Queen of Woolwich. We learned a lot about the Pearlies’ traditions, their charity work, and their costumes, known as buttons, which they sew themselves to illustrate their personal histories. Clive and Kim also led us in some songs, and an utterly astonishing version of Jerusalem played on the spoons.

September 2020

In September we began with gentle but effective Pilates exercises under the guidance of Jo Everill-Taylor of Better Body Training in Hersham. Jo explained how our daily activities (particularly sitting in front of a computer) can make our vertebrae compact, and we need to stretch in order to mobilise the spine and prevent injury. Remarkably, she was keeping an good eye on us all on her Zoom gallery view, commenting if she thought someone looked concerned.

This was followed by June Davey on the long and fascinating history of West Horsley Place and its inhabitants. One of these was Carew Raleigh, son of Sir Walter, and the question we would very much like answered is, did the red velvet bag found in the house once contain Sir Walter’s head? The V&A is on the case. West Horsley Place really is a gem on our doorsteps, with big plans for the future.

October 2020

In the first part of the October meeting we heard from three members of Esher and District Citizens Advice Bureau. Elaine (CEO), Valerie (Financial Capability Team) and Helen (Disability Benefits Team) gave us an excellent picture of the integrated and well-rounded service that the CAB provides, addressing problems that have so many facets. We were very impressed by the case stories – CAB staff, most of them volunteers, stay with their clients until resolution is found, often up to court hearings which are usually successful.

Most disturbing were the facts that there are currently 6,050 people in Elmbridge claiming Universal Credit – 12 months ago there were fewer than 1000. Covid is to thank, but more worryingly, there are not commensurate levels of enquiries regarding debt – suppressed for now, but a bomb waiting to explode. The CAB is something we all think we know about, but clearly we didn’t know very much. We all learned a great deal.

In the second part we were treated to some magnificent wildlife photographs courtesy of Tom Way. While we saw an occasional lion and tiger, his focus was on UK animals, especially birds. Tempted by treats on some occasions but mostly deftly tracked, the subjects were captured displaying almost human characteristics. And sorry Tom, it may be an old picture, but we liked the puffin coming in to land best.

November 2020

After the AGM our November speaker was local historian David Taylor, who took us on a journey back to the days when Cobham High Street was a narrow village street, complete with petrol station, department store, pubs, private houses, butchers, and greengrocers. How different it would look today if the proposal to bypass the village had been adopted in the Sixties, and many of the buildings saved. The ‘then and now’ photographs were fascinating, and David’s own reminiscences of growing up in Cobham brought them to life.

December 2020

At our Christmas meeting everyone was decked out in a sparkling array of festive hats, jumpers, tinsel garlands, Christmas earrings, brooches and necklaces, and we were treated to some splendid cooking by chef Alex Mackay.

Alex delivered a very entertaining class on what to do with turkey leftovers, which took us into the realms of Japanese, Moroccan, and Chinese flavours. Plus there was a lovely light salad with black rice and a spicy cranberry salsa. All his inspiring tips and suggestions as he talked had us scribbling away.

January 2021

We began our January meeting with some gentle stretching with guidance from Melanie Smith, some simple but effective moves to get us going in the mornings at a time when regular classes and exercise in general are more difficult to come by.

Then we heard Regine Neuhauser, who joined us from Vienna. Regine has long been fascinated by Maria Theresa of Austria, and with good reason. In a talk packed with information, she revealed Maria Theresa to be an extraordinary woman who, in the face of hostility from other states and no money in the coffers, preserved a huge empire and was a significant reformer, all while giving birth to 16 children, including Marie Antoinette.



 Dr Geoffrey Mead’s entertaining Resorting to the Coast covered the development of the seaside as a holiday destination – featuring places familiar to many of us - and then Jo Mabbutt talked about The Field of the Cloth of Gold, a spectacular meeting between Henry VIII and Francis I of France in 1520. Geoffrey explained how, in the 18th century, the wealthy gradually began to take holidays on the coast rather than their accustomed spas, particularly around London, not least because their tradesmen were visiting the same places, and ‘dens of iniquity’ were springing up in places such as Tunbridge Wells. He categorised the main reasons for going to the coast broadly as: 18th century, taking the waters and dipping in the sea; 19th century, taking the sea air; 20th century, getting a tan; and so far in the 21st century, access to fresh seafood. Along the way racecourses, piers, motor racing circuits, holiday camps, bandstands, pavilions, aquariums, and much more developed as ways of keeping the wealthy amused, in town, and spending their money. A trend for